all aspects of designing and installing data communications networks that employ single and multi-channel satellite, tropospheric scatter, terrestrial microwave, switching, messaging, video-teleconferencing, visual information, and other related systems.

Signal support encompasses

all aspects of designing and installing data communications networks that employ single and multi-channel satellite, tropospheric scatter, terrestrial microwave, switching, messaging, video-teleconferencing, visual information, and other related systems.
integrate tactical, strategic and sustain base communications, information processing and management systems into a seamless global information network that supports knowledge dominance for the Army, joint and coalition operations.

Signal Soldiers

integrate tactical, strategic and sustain base communications, information processing and management systems into a seamless global information network that supports knowledge dominance for the Army, joint and coalition operations.
develops, tests, provides, and manages communications and information systems support for the command and control of combined arms forces.

The United States Army Signal Corps

develops, tests, provides, and manages communications and information systems support for the command and control of combined arms forces.
we give our Army the voice to give command on battlefield or global span, in combat, we're always in the fight we speed the message day or night, technicians too, ever skillful, ever watchful, we're the Army Signal Corps.

From flag and torch in the Civil War, to signal satellites afar,

we give our Army the voice to give command on battlefield or global span, in combat, we're always in the fight we speed the message day or night, technicians too, ever skillful, ever watchful, we're the Army Signal Corps.
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All ACs are published on the Worldwide Web as well as in print.

Your manuscript package should consist of these items:
Cover letter/e-mail identification statement -- As cover page include, author(s) name and best work phone number(s), e-mail address and manuscript word count;
Manuscript -- 1,000-3,000 word original, unpublished manuscript submitted as a word processing document and with proper attribution to sources;
Bio -- Author biographical sentences at article’s end;
Acronym list – Following the short author biography, provide an alphabetized list of the meanings of all acronyms used in the article in the following format: CONUS – Continental United States;
Photo/graphic captions -- Word processing document containing adequate description of the photograph, including full names, action in photo/illustrations date and location;
Photographs/graphics should be submitted as separate items and not imbedded in the word processing document or in a PowerPoint slide.
Articles are generally 1-3,000 words. This is not rigid. If the material warrants greater coverage, we will accommodate that. If you have a long article (greater than 2,000 words) it really needs supporting graphics or photographs to keep reader interest. A good rule of thumb is at least one graphic/photo per 1,000 words.
Each type printed page is about 750 words.
You may want to take a look at the following links that provides information about Army Communicator style standards:

Writers Guide

Style Manual

In particular, two things we always have to request after the fact are the author bio and the acronym listing. A paragraph in the Style Guide at the above link says: “Do not use any acronym on first reference, not even common acronyms. Spell them out the first time they appear in your article. Then use the acronym on second and subsequent references. Do not put acronyms in parentheses after the phrase like this Continental United States (CONUS). Instead simply write Continental United States. At the end of the article provide an alphabetical list of all acronyms and what they mean in the following format: CONUS - Continental United States.
Army Communicator Editor-in-chief
(706) 791-7204  

If you have questions/concerns the writer's guidance doesn't answer, please feel free to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
anytime. We look forward to reading your article.